The Importance of Back Brushing

How to Combine Spraying and Brushing When Applying Paint To Rough Siding

Using an airless paint sprayer for your next painting project can help tremendously in speeding things up. It’s no secret that spray application is much faster than using a paint brush so it only makes sense to go ahead and spray apply your coatings instead, right? Well not so fast…because there are lots of situations where using a sprayer can actually sacrifice the over all quality of the job as compared to putting it on with a brush.

Spray application causes paint to settle on the surface of the substrate you are coating, which is fine when you are spraying a smooth or non-porous surface. However, if the wall or overhang you happen to be painting is textured or rough, the spray application method lacks the physical force of a real human being pushing that paint into the cracks and crevices to be covered. A good paint job should dry as a solid finish, uninterrupted by pin holes or little hidden unpainted spots naturally found in a rough surface.

So how do we remedy this problem? How can we save time by using our fast and efficient paint sprayer without sacrificing quality at the same time? The answer is toPaint Sprayer Reviews use both! That rights… the solution used by professional when faced with having to paint miles of long rough sawn siding is to use a technique known within the industry as “back brushing”. Back brushing allows you to really get the best of both worlds when your set up and technique is done correctly because what you are doing, essentially is using your sprayer to simply get the paint on the wall and using your brush to work it in and smooth it.

This techniques is great because in a matter of seconds you can wet out an area, say 3 ft by 5 ft (just an example) set the gun down, and then use your paint brush to finish the area. You’ll be amazed at how much thicker and better the rough or textured wall will look after it has been worked in with a brush. Not only will the force of your hand push the paint into all the cracks and holes, but it will dry to a “dry film thickness” much more in millage than when just spray applied. And ultimately, it’s this added millage and superior penetration that will allow this paint job to last years longer than its simply sprayed counterpart.

 

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